Friday, July 15, 2011

There is Always Work to Be Done


There is always something that needs doing. It can be lonely work but thankfully only 14 rows remain to be to pruned!

14 comments:

  1. Wow! Lots of work! Beautiful image.

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  2. Nice! I really like the graininess of this shot. And I'd probably like this sort of work. It looks like very tedious work but it would be very rewarding also. Cheers from Montreal!

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  3. It's a big job. But see that you will soon spring. Peter.

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  4. Oh God Rae... our home in France bordered many acres of vineyards and we'd see people in -2C weather out clipping in mid winter. At least it's not that cold with you! Lovely shot.

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  5. Yes Rae - lots of back breaking work _ I'm sure you will be pleased when it's all behind you.
    Have a lovely week-end.

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  6. I'll never complain about pruning my roses again Rae, what a huge job! Love your vineyard pictures.

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  7. You could have a solo blog on your vineyard. Ideal method to show that Australia does indeed have seasons.

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  8. Julie, I must admit that it has gone through my mind recently. Probably will start a blog on the viruses when I am not working full-time from November this year. Would be great fun and I am sure there would be lots to share.

    Grace, the funny thing is, the roses still need to be done and I have no idea when I will get around to it all!.

    Craig, thankfully, although Nannup get get quite cold, it has been mostly quite mild although rain has from time to time mad pruning difficult.

    Ken, any time you make it over this way, you are most welcome to come and give pruning a go. Enjoy your blog of Montreal. Love to visit one day. .

    Luis, Peter, Dianne, thanks for your comments.

    Rae

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  9. Is that a person in the middle of the vines? What a job! Is hand pruning the only way?

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  10. As we only have 6000 vines, hand pruning is the way we go. It's pretty exhausting and tedious work. Here, the person is using our electric shears - not something to get them near your hands. For others it the good old sort of hand shears on our place. Before we prune, we go through and hedge as this makes it all so much easier to do the pruning.

    For bigger vineyards there is mechanical pruning by machine. How this works over time in keeping a good shape to the whole vine I'm not sure. For us though, we relay on friends and family to put their backs to the vine; of course we provide all the food and dare I say , wine, for the weekend and have a pretty good time along the way.

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  11. "only" 6000 vines. I'm not sure that's how I'd be thinking as I reached the last few:-) The food and wine would be welcome, though..

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  12. When we started out with the vineyard Alan, some good advice was not the go over this number as we could at least do the work as a "family vineyard". What good advice that was! So while probably in the big scheme of things, that is compared with some other (bigger) growers we would be very small, it is certainly enough vines (and wine) for our family concern. And the wine and food does keep us going! When picking is on, I spend most of the day in the kitchen from morning until into the night. But it's all enjoyable, heaps of fun and a feeling of achievement when the last grape bins are picked up.

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  13. Do you crush and then make your own wines, or do you bulk sell to other larger concerns? Who is the vigneron? What sort of wine does your vineyard 'specialise' in? Let us know if/when you branch out (grin) blogwise. I will be a follower.

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  14. Hi Julie, Up until this year after picking the grapes - mainly Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon - we delivered the grapes to a vineyard in Margaret River for crushing and wine making. This year we have processed the grapes ourselves with our son as the winemaker. While most of our wines are red, we do also have a small number of white variety vines - Chardonay and Semillon. The whole vineyard and wine making is an interesting experience and I will probably start a blog to share our experiences on the vineyard after November this year when my work becomes freelance.

    Rae

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